Hortonville Area School District - Penelope Miller - Communication Calendar http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/events_rss.cfm?detailid=100157 Hortonville Area School District - Penelope Miller - Communication Calendar en-us DAY 8 - Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - June 20, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310467&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - DAY 8
 
♦Please take this survey first today to tell us your last day of Summer School 2018. (Take this survey only one time!)
 

♦Check out Kano coding resources.


♦LEARNING POST-ASSESSMENTS:

On your last day (or before), using no notes:

1) Take the Computer Science POST-TEST.

2) Take the Coding POST-TEST.

 
 

♦CODING & COMPUTER SCIENCE VOCAB CHECK-UP:
 
♦OPTIONAL: Play Quizlet Live with our class.
 
1) Take the Matching QUIZLET Coding Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
2) Take the Matching QUIZLET Computer Science Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
♦Based on your current score, STUDY Coding and Computer Science vocabulary terms in Quizlet to prepare for two class FINAL ASSESSMENTS.
 

 

Code.org CONDITIONALS (Coding with Cards):

Lesson Overview:

 

Students explore conditionals, especially as they pertain to loops and if-statements as they play a class game. After introducing the idea of conditionals, if-statements, and loops, the class can practice together using a pre-written program, a deck of cards, and luck of the draw.

 

 
 
Essential Question:
What are conditionals, and how do they help us to write effective programs?
 
 

• I can gain experience determining the outcome (true or false) of conditionals.

I can evaluate logical statements to determine which branch of a program to follow.

 
 
 

Algorithm — (n.) A list of steps to finish a task. A set of instructions that can be performed with or without a computer.

Conditional — (n.) A statement that is either true or false depending on the situation.

Decrement — (n.) To subtract a certain amount (often 1), once or many times

Else — (n.) Another way of saying “Otherwise”

Function — (n.) A piece of code that can be called over and over

If Statement — (n.) A line that determines whether or not you run a certain chunk of code.

Increment — (n.) To add a certain amount (often 1), once or many times

Loop — (n.) The action of doing something over and over again.

Nested Statements — (n.) A statement inside another statement

 


 

 
 
 
REVIEW:

Think back to our last sun-catcher functions lesson.

 

Class Participation Questions:

• What did we do in our last lesson with the sun-catchers?

• What are functions, and how did we use them in the sun-catchers lesson?

• How is a while block different from an if block?

 

Partner Discussion:

• Can you think of anything we do in real life that could be described with a while loop?

 

Lesson Steps:

Today we will be playing a card game and in the process, learn about conditionals and if-statements.

 

To begin, let’s review conditionals, which you have already seen in the online Blockly activities.

 

It can be helpful to start with some real-life inspirational examples:

 

“If you all raise your hand, I will clap. Otherwise, I will touch my nose.”

 

Discuss:

“What just happened there?”

“I gave you a ‘condition’ right? I said, that under one condition I would do one thing, but if that condition wasn’t met, I would do something else. Conditionals are the way computers make decisions.”

 

Let’s try another one, adding the “Else” terminology.

 

If you all put your hands on your desks, I will scratch my head. Else, I will put my hand on my hip.”

 

This is similar enough to the first case that you should be able to infer what the “else” is saying, but if you have trouble, remember that “else” is very similar to the word “otherwise.”

 

“Good job. Now let’s make this a little more interesting. I have a stack of playing cards here. We’re going to play a game.

 

If I draw a red card, I get a point.

 

Else, you get a point.”

 

Let’s look at this simple statement and point to each case as it happens.

 

We will draw a few cards from the top of the pile, and add points appropriately. When the card is red, show them which case you look at (the top one) and when it’s black, point out that it matches the “Else” case.

 

After a few rounds, we are now ready to step it up a notch.

 

“Okay, we’re going to use this idea of conditions, or ‘Conditionals’ to play a game. We call these ‘If Statements’ conditionals, because there is a ‘condition’ placed on them. Something is either true, or it’s not. If it’s true, we do the instruction inside the ‘If Statement’. Otherwise, we do the instruction inside of the ‘Else’.”

 

We are now going to play a game. The game will last 4 turns on each side. The class will be split into “Left Side” and “Right Side.” They will compete to see who gets the most points.

 

Just so we’re all clear about the rules, let’s look at them carefully below.

 

1) if (card.color == black) {

2) team.points += 1;

3) }

4) else {

5) team.points -=1;

6) }

 

The code represented above is how conditionals are written in JavaScript, the world’s most widely adopted programming language.

 

In the online activities in this course, we’ve been writing code with Blockly, which uses visual blocks to represent code. The code we’ve been writing in those activities can also be represented in other programming languages. For instance, in our online activities, if you click “Show Code” in the purple header, you can see the blocks on your workspace represented in Javascript.

 

Again, below is code for the activity we’ll be doing today:

 

1) if (card.color == black) {

2) team.points += 1;

3) }

4) else {

5) team.points -=1;

6) }

 

Let’s review this format line by line, since it will probably be a new sight to most of us.

 

1) This line is your “If Statement.” This is the line that lets you know that “If the color of the card is equal to black, you do THIS.” Notice how there are two equal signs? In many programming languages, this is how we say that we’re checking for equality, not assigning something to be equal to. This line ends with an “opening curly brace.” That’s there to let us know that the next line belongs to the “If Statement”.

 

2) This line literally says, “Points plus equals one”. It means that you take whatever number of points that you had, and add one to it. Whatever that equals is your new points value.

 

3) This is a “closing curly brace.” It is there to tell you that the “If Statement” has ended.

 

4) Here is the start of the “Else” statement. At the end of this line, you’ll see another opening brace. That means that this is the beginning of the piece that we do if we don’t match the “If Statement.”

 

5) This is very similar to line 2 but with one difference. Can anyone spot what it is? What do you suppose it does? (It means that you take whatever number of points that you had, and subtract one from it. Whatever that equals is your new points value.)

 

6) Finally, in line 7, we have the last “closing curly brace.” It tells us that the “Else Statement” is done.

 

Here’s the JavaScript written next to the same code represented in pseudocode, which is informally-written code that’s easy for people to read. Each line of pseudocode explains what that line of JavaScript is doing.

 

After our review of each line, it’s good to take a step back and look at the big picture.

 

  • What does this actually mean?
  • Can we put it into actual words?
  • Essentially it says that if a person draws a black card, the team gets a point. Otherwise, the team loses a point.
  • Should we get started?

 

We will pick volunteers from each team to be the “programmers.”

 

Each of the programmers will draw a face card. (This isn’t required, but it’s a fun way to choose which team goes first.)

 

As assigned, programmers will pick a student with a numbered card. That student will hold up his or her card.

 

  • What color is it?
  • What line does it match to?
  • What does that do to your team’s points?

 

Move to a programmer from the opposite team, and repeat until all programmers have had a turn.

 

  • What are the final points?
  • Which team is the winner?

 

If the game goes quickly enough, we will choose another program and start again. If it goes *really* well, we will challenge our class to modify the program to provide more options.

 

CHALLENGE: When we’ve played it through a couple of times, let’s try explaining and adding other features, like “While Loops,” or “Nested Statements.”

 


♦Check your Accelerated Intro to CS Course Progress so far in your Code.org account:

 
 
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 
 
 

 

The Artist 3 Code.org Activity

 

♦ In these puzzles, you are a zombie artist who loves drawing. Help him to draw designs and shapes using special colors using all the same blocks arranged in categories: Actions: Move Forward, Turn, Draw; Color: Set Color; Loops: Repeat; and Math: change value.
 

Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo and check notifications for our Coding and Computer Science group. Check your Profile for Edmodo badges earned so far.
 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and work in your Accelerated Intro to CS Course activities.
 
 
3) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 
4) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 

 
 
  Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Wed, 20 Jun 2018
DAY 8 - Coding & Computer Science for Kids 2 - June 20, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310482&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 2 - DAY 8
 

 
 

Lesson Overview:

Students prepare and present a mini-lesson, game, or activity to teach the class a key coding or computer science concept that continues our learning in computer science. Our final wrap-up session in the 20-hour Accelerated Intro to CS Course series will help us to relive our favorite moments, while providing us with the next steps to take to continue our computer science learning journey on our own.

 

 
 
Essential Question:

Which computer science or coding concept(s) or skill(s) do I wish to review and teach the class?

 

• I can recall learning events covered over last summer's 20 Code.org lessons.

• I can reinvent concepts already covered by creating new games, activities, or mini-lessons.

• I can work in small groups to blend seemingly unique subjects.

 
 
 

 

♦Review previous lessons covered last summer and in your Code.org account:

 

 


Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo. Read ALL sself-introductions and then check the Coding and Computer Science badges you have earned in your Profile. Post your own special Code.org creations to our Coding and Computer Science 2 group. Join group code: g4we36.
 

 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and click View course to check your progress and continue working. Finish ALL course activities in order until they all turn green.
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 

 
3) Join our CodeHSclass. Or use code 5CE47.
 

 
4) Create or log in to your Scratch account. (Use a nickname or screen name that is not your real name). Complete the Scratch Tutorials to start making your own projects.
 

 
 

 
 

 
7) Interested in learning Python?
 

 
 

 
 
9) Create or log in to your SoloLearn account to learn to code:
 
 
 
 

 

10) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 

11) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 
 
 

 
 
 
Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Wed, 20 Jun 2018
DAY 9 - Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - June 21, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310468&memberid=134
 
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - DAY 9
 
♦Please take this survey first today to tell us your last day of Summer School 2018. (Take this survey only one time!)
 

♦LEARNING POST-ASSESSMENTS:

On your last day (or before), using no notes:

1) Take the Computer Science POST-TEST.

2) Take the Coding POST-TEST.

 
 

♦CODING & COMPUTER SCIENCE VOCAB CHECK-UP:
 
♦OPTIONAL: Play Quizlet Live with our class.
 
1) Take the Matching QUIZLET Coding Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
2) Take the Matching QUIZLET Computer Science Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
♦Based on your current score, STUDY Coding and Computer Science vocabulary terms in Quizlet to prepare for two class FINAL ASSESSMENTS.
 

 

Code.org SONG-WRITING (Functions):

Lesson Overview:

 

Students learn how to define and call functions using the chorus of song lyrics. Once students are familiar with the define/call process, we will add the extra capabilities that come along with passing parameters within those function calls.

 

 
 
Essential Question:

What are functions, and how do we define and call them as the chorus when singing songs?

 
 

• I can learn about defining functions.

• I can practice calling functions.

• I can see the practicality of passing variables as parameters.

 
 
Key Vocabulary:
 

Chorus — (n.) A piece of music that repeats often.

Function — (n.) A piece of code that can be called over and over.

Function Call — (n.) The piece of a program that sends the computer to a function.

Function Definition — (n.) The piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function.

Parameters — (n.) Extra information that you can give to a function to customize it

Recursive — (n.) A definition that refers to the word it is trying to define.

Variable – (n.) A placeholder for a value that can change.

 


 

 
 
 
REVIEW:

Think back to our last conditionals card game lesson.

Class Participation Questions:

• What did we do in our last lesson?

• What is a function?

• What does it mean to call a function?

• What is a counter block?

 

Partner Discussion:

• In many languages, “counter blocks” are called “for loops.” They’re called that because you do *something* FOR all values of the counter from the minimum to the maximum.

• Pretend you have a counter block that keeps track of your age. From age 5 to age 10, you grow two inches a year. From age 11 to age 17, you grow an inch every two years. This requires two blocks. What is the minimum value, maximum value, and add-on amount for each block?

 

Lesson Steps:

Today we will be singing children’s songs, and in the process, learn about how to call and define functions.

 

INTRODUCE:

This lesson works best if we just leap right in. Let’s sing the lyrics of "Oh, Dear! What Can the Matter Be?" together below:

 

CHORUS:

Oh, dear! What can the matter be?

Dear, dear! What can the matter be?

Oh, dear! What can the matter be?

Johnny’s so long at the fair.

 

SONG:

 

Chorus

He promised to buy me a trinket to please me,

And then for a smile, oh, he vowed he would tease me,

He promised to buy me a bunch of blue ribbons

To tie up my bonnie brown hair.

 

Chorus

He promised to bring me a basket of posies,

A garland of lilies, a gift of red roses,

A little straw hat to set off the blue ribbons

That tie up my bonnie brown hair.

 

Chorus

 

“Great job! Give yourself a round of applause.”

 

“Oddly, none of you (or very few of you) sang the actual word ‘CHORUS’. You didn’t say, ‘CHORUS. He promised to buy me a trinket...’ Why is that?”

 

We may not exactly know why we sang the way we sang. Some may know the song, others may have figured out the technique. This is a great time to point out the terminology of “function definition” and “function call.”

 

A Function Call is the piece of a program that sends the computer to a function. In this case, the word Chorus is a function call.

 

A Function Definition is the piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function. In this case, the function definition is the CHORUS identified as “Oh, dear! What can the matter be? / Dear, dear! What can the matter be? / Oh, dear! What can the matter be? / Johnny’s so long at the fair” at the beginning of the song.

 

The second part of this lesson is introducing a song where the chorus lyrics change slightly for each round.

 

Let’s sing these original verses together:

 

CHORUS (sound):

With a sound sound here

And a sound sound there

Here a sound, there a sound

Everywhere a sound sound

Old MacDonald had a farm E-I-E-I-O

 

SONG:

Old MACDONALD had a farm E-I-E-I-O

And on his farm, he had a cow E-I-E-I-O

CHORUS (“Moo”)

 

Old MACDONALD had a farm E-I-E-I-O

And on his farm, he had a pig E-I-E-I-O

CHORUS (“Oink”)

 

Old MACDONALD had a farm E-I-E-I-O

And on his farm he had a duck E-I-E-I-O

CHORUS (“Quack”)

 

Now let’s add-on to the song with lyrics about other animals.

 

What would you put in the chorus parentheses for a dog? A cat?

 

Hopefully you will intuitively know what happens with the sounds that you provide, but if you aren’t yet making a connection between passing a word in through the parentheses and calling that word inside the definition of the chorus, use one finger to indicate which sound you are using, and another to trace where you are in the chorus.

 

You may not have realized it yet, but you have just learned how to pass a parameter to a function! This is exactly how programmers share bits of information with functions that they have written.

 

You can pass certain values into a function, so that the function can use the information with the code inside. The function will just replace the reserved word (which, in our song, is created in the form of the variable sound) with whatever word you gave it inside the parentheses.

 

Let’s test that newfound knowledge with a completely made-up song:

 

CHORUS (thing, place, did):

‘Cause I stuck a thing in a hole in the place and it did, and did, and did.

 

SONG:

 

I’m going to be the most famous kid, because of the thing that I just did.

CHORUS (“seed”, “ground”, “grew”)

 

I’m going to be the most famous kid, because of the thing that I just did.

 

CHORUS (“plug”, “boat”, “floats”)

 

I’m going to be the most famous kid, because of the thing that I just did.

CHORUS (“head”, “sky”, “flies”)

 

This made-up song here give us our class an opportunity to figure out what happens when we pass more than one parameter to a function.

 

After we sing through the song and understand which variable goes where, we will break into small groups and work together to figure out how to rewrite other children’s songs:

 

1) "Five Little Monkeys" – (Most Simple)

2) "Farmer in the Dell" – (Tougher)

3) "Hickory Dickory Dock" – (More Complicated)

 

Additional Student Requested Songs with CHORUS Lyrics:

"Monsters (AKA Haters)" - Mackenzie Ziegler

"Fly Like an Eagle" - Steve Miller Band

 

After you have had a while to work, we will come back together to share our results.

  • How many people rewrote their songs the same way?
  • How many had different solutions?

 


♦Check your Accelerated Intro to CS Course Progress so far in your Code.org account:

 
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 
 
 

 

 

The Farmer 2 Code.org Activity

 

♦Use the blocks to help the farmer remove all the piles and fill in all the holes on the ground. Hint: You can put a loop inside another loop. Use all the same blocks arranged in categories: Actions: Move Forward, Turn, Remove, Fill; Logic: If there is a pile, hole, path ahead; and Loops: While path ahead, Repeat; and Math: change value.
 

Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo and check notifications for our Coding and Computer Science group. Check your Profile for Edmodo badges earned so far.
 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and work in your Accelerated Intro to CS Course activities.
 
 
3) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 
4) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 

 
 
  Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Thu, 21 Jun 2018
DAY 9 - Coding & Computer Science for Kids 2 - June 21, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310483&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 2 - DAY 9
 

 
 

Lesson Overview:

Students prepare and present a mini-lesson, game, or activity to teach the class a key coding or computer science concept that continues our learning in computer science. Our final wrap-up session in the 20-hour Accelerated Intro to CS Course series will help us to relive our favorite moments, while providing us with the next steps to take to continue our computer science learning journey on our own.

 

 
 
Essential Question:

Which computer science or coding concept(s) or skill(s) do I wish to review and teach the class?

 

• I can recall learning events covered over last summer's 20 Code.org lessons.

• I can reinvent concepts already covered by creating new games, activities, or mini-lessons.

• I can work in small groups to blend seemingly unique subjects.

 
 
 

 

♦Review previous lessons covered last summer and in your Code.org account:

 

 


Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo. Read ALL sself-introductions and then check the Coding and Computer Science badges you have earned in your Profile. Post your own special Code.org creations to our Coding and Computer Science 2 group. Join group code: g4we36.
 

 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and click View course to check your progress and continue working. Finish ALL course activities in order until they all turn green.
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 

 
3) Join our CodeHSclass. Or use code 5CE47.
 

 
4) Create or log in to your Scratch account. (Use a nickname or screen name that is not your real name). Complete the Scratch Tutorials to start making your own projects.
 

 
 

 
 

 
7) Interested in learning Python?
 

 
 

 
 
9) Create or log in to your SoloLearn account to learn to code:
 
 
 
 

 

10) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 

11) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 
 
 

 
 
 
Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Thu, 21 Jun 2018
DAY 10 - Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - June 22, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310469&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - DAY 10
 
♦Please take this survey first today to tell us your last day of Summer School 2018. (Take this survey only one time!)
 

♦LEARNING POST-ASSESSMENTS:

On your last day (or before), using no notes:

1) Take the Computer Science POST-TEST.

2) Take the Coding POST-TEST.

 
 

♦CODING & COMPUTER SCIENCE VOCAB CHECK-UP:
 
♦OPTIONAL: Play Quizlet Live with our class.
 
1) Take the Matching QUIZLET Coding Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
2) Take the Matching QUIZLET Computer Science Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
♦Based on your current score, STUDY Coding and Computer Science vocabulary terms in Quizlet to prepare for two class FINAL ASSESSMENTS.
 

 

CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE - DAY 10
 
Code.org ABSTRACTIONS (Mad Libs):
 

Lesson Overview:

 

Students learn to see how often they use abstraction in their daily routines and use a Mad-Lib style thinking game to learn about the effectiveness of abstraction.

 

 
 
Essential Question:

What are abstractions, and how do we use them in our everyday lives?

 

• I can explore and internalize the idea of “abstraction.”

• I can combine writing and abstraction to test my own creativity.

• I can analyze my day to find differences that I can turn into similarities.

 
 
Key Vocabulary:
 

Abstraction (n.) Removing details from a solution so that it can work for many problems.

Specific(adj.) Referring to only one exact thing.

Template (n.) A frame to guide you in creating something new.

Function — (n.) A piece of code that can be called over and over.

Function Call — (n.) The piece of a program that sends the computer to a function.

Function Definition — (n.) The piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function.

Parameters — (n.) Extra information that you can give to a function to customize it.

Variable — (n.) A placeholder for a value that can change.

 


 

 
 
 
REVIEW:

Think back to our last song-writing lesson.

Class Participation Questions:

• What did we do in our last song-writing lesson?

• What kind of functions did we define in our last lesson?

• What was special about a function versus any other block dragged out to the canvas?

 

Partner Discussion:

• Try to remember how you created a function to remove 8 shovels of dirt all the way down a path in the Farmer.

• How would you write a similar program for drawing stars on your notebook paper, if you wanted a star on the top line, then another star every three lines all the way down to the bottom? Our program requires two blocks. What is the minimum value, maximum value, and add-on amount for each block?

 

Lesson Steps:

 

Ask students: “So, what did you have for waffles this morning?”

 

“No one? Okay, what did you have for toast yesterday?”

 

Allow students time to process these questions.

 

“See what I was doing there? I identified my experience in a very specific manner, and that made it harder for everyone else to relate to. What could I have said that more people would have understood?”

 

(Hopefully, the idea of using “breakfast” in place of the actual food that was consumed will be considered by students here.)

 

“In a way, the word ‘breakfast’ is like a variable that we use to hold a space for whatever it is we ate this morning. By taking the specific word out and replacing the space it leaves with ‘breakfast,’ we are using abstraction to make something work for multiple people.”

 

• Can you give us some examples of other places that you may naturally use abstraction to allow more people to understand you?

• Is there anything *not* food related?

 

Next, you will receive a fill-in-the-blank” story that started as a specific story about one thing. However, we used abstraction to turn some of the specific words into blanks, and now the story can be about lots of things. Ask students what they can make their story about.

 

 

First you take your (_______) then add a layer of (_______) before you pour on a hearty dose of (_______). Next, press some (_______) down into the (_______) before covering with a sprinkle of (_______). That’s how I make a (_______)!

 

Allow students the chance to share their stories with the class.

 

• How similar or different were they?

• Did someone have a version that was almost identical to another student’s?

• Did anyone have a story that is completely different?

 

Next, ask if this reminds the students of anything else you have done in class. (Hopefully, they will find it like the CHORUS activity from the last lesson.)

 

Use this opportunity to share that the reason we search for abstraction is so that we can find one solution that will work for many things, just as we were creating one chorus that works for many verses in a song.

 

Now, give the students the page that has two different stories that were created from the same template.

 

• Can you figure out what places need to be abstracted?

• What does your abstracted story look like?

• Can you create a third story, using the abstracted template?

 

• Can you abstract the template even further, even if the three versions of the stories don’t require it?

• What might that look like?

• Does a more abstract template have more or less flexibility?

• Is there a point when abstracting a template is no longer helpful?

• What about when the entire story is blank?

 

 

BLANK TEMPLATE

Story 1:

Early last year, my mom gave me an old skateboard. She told me about the days when she would ride it from her school in her hometown. I tried to ride it once, but tripped over my shoelaces. It didn’t take long before I decided that it was best to leave the skateboarding to my mom.

Story 2:

Sometime last year, my mom told me an old story. She told me about the days when she would hear it from her father in her childhood. I tried to tell it once, but tripped over my words. It didn’t take long before I decided that it was best to leave the storytelling to my mom.

 

Extension: If time remains at the end of this lesson, have the students create their own templates from scratch. Allow them to trade stories with their classmates and see what happens!

 


 

♦Check your Accelerated Intro to CS Course Progress so far in your Code.org account:

 
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 
 
 

 

 

 

♦Once again, you are a zombie artist who loves drawing. However, these puzzle show you how the functions are defined. Defining a function doesn't run its blocks. Help the zombie to draw designs and shapes by defining and pulling out functions like "draw a square" and "draw a circle." Use special colors and all the same blocks arranged in categories: Actions: Move Forward, Turn, Remove, Fill; Logic: If there is a pile, hole, path ahead; and Loops: While path ahead, Repeat; and Math: change value.
 

Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo and check notifications for our Coding and Computer Science group. Check your Profile for Edmodo badges earned so far.
 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and work in your Accelerated Intro to CS Course activities.
 
 
3) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 
4) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 

 
 
  Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Fri, 22 Jun 2018
DAY 610 - Coding & Computer Science for Kids 2 - June 22, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310484&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 2 - DAY 10
 

 
 

Lesson Overview:

Students prepare and present a mini-lesson, game, or activity to teach the class a key coding or computer science concept that continues our learning in computer science. Our final wrap-up session in the 20-hour Accelerated Intro to CS Course series will help us to relive our favorite moments, while providing us with the next steps to take to continue our computer science learning journey on our own.

 

 
 
Essential Question:

Which computer science or coding concept(s) or skill(s) do I wish to review and teach the class?

 

• I can recall learning events covered over last summer's 20 Code.org lessons.

• I can reinvent concepts already covered by creating new games, activities, or mini-lessons.

• I can work in small groups to blend seemingly unique subjects.

 
 
 

 

♦Review previous lessons covered last summer and in your Code.org account:

 

 


Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo. Read ALL sself-introductions and then check the Coding and Computer Science badges you have earned in your Profile. Post your own special Code.org creations to our Coding and Computer Science 2 group. Join group code: g4we36.
 

 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and click View course to check your progress and continue working. Finish ALL course activities in order until they all turn green.
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 

 
3) Join our CodeHSclass. Or use code 5CE47.
 

 
4) Create or log in to your Scratch account. (Use a nickname or screen name that is not your real name). Complete the Scratch Tutorials to start making your own projects.
 

 
 

 
 

 
7) Interested in learning Python?
 

 
 

 
 
9) Create or log in to your SoloLearn account to learn to code:
 
 
 
 

 

10) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 

11) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 
 
 

 
 
 
Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Fri, 22 Jun 2018
DAY 11 - Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - June 25, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310470&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids - DAY 11
 
♦Please take this survey first today to tell us your last day of Summer School 2018. (Take this survey only one time!)
 

♦LEARNING POST-ASSESSMENTS:

On your last day (or before), using no notes:

1) Take the Computer Science POST-TEST.

2) Take the Coding POST-TEST.

 
 

♦CODING & COMPUTER SCIENCE VOCAB CHECK-UP:
 
 
♦OPTIONAL: Play Quizlet Live with our class.
 
1) Take the Matching QUIZLET Coding Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
2) Take the Matching QUIZLET Computer Science Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
♦Based on your current score, STUDY Coding and Computer Science vocabulary terms in Quizlet to prepare for two class FINAL ASSESSMENTS.
 

 

CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE - DAY 11
 
Code.org RELAY PROGRAMMING:
 

Lesson Overview:

Students build upon their program writing skills introduced in the previous Graph Paper Programming activity and learn the importance of completing programs in proper sequence and checking programs frequently for bugs. Students run a relay race, where they dash across a space to write an algorithm based on a Graph Paper Programming image. Each student can only write one instruction at a time, and if there is an error somewhere, they need to erase everything back to that point.

 

 
 
Essential Question:

What are bugs, and how do we prevent and fix them?

 

• I can learn to check carefully my own work and the work of others.

• I can test the sequence of completed programs.

• I can practice imagining expected outcomes.

• I can practice completing “thinking tasks” under pressure.

 
 
Key Vocabulary:
 

Algorithm — (n.) A list of steps to finish a task. A set of instructions that can be performed with or without a computer.

Bugs — (n.) Problems with your code.

Code — (n.) One or more commands or algorithm(s) designed to be carried

out by a computer.

Debugging — (v.) Fixing problems in your code.

Persistence — (n.) Trying again and again, even when something is very hard.

Program — (n.) Set of instructions for your computer to follow.

Queue — (n.) 1. A waiting line; 2. A sequence of messages or jobs held in temporary storage in a computer awaiting transmission or processing.

Sequence — (n.) The order in which things are done.

 


 

 
 
 
REVIEW:

Think back to our last Abstractions lesson.

Class Participation Questions:

• What did we do in our last lesson?

• Do you remember what a parameter is?

• Is a parameter also a variable? Why or why not?

 

 


Lesson Steps:

1) Graph Paper Programming Review and Debugging Practice

We will practice the Graph Paper Programming first, debug a line of programming that has errors, and then play a relay-type game in two small groups.

Computer scientists are always facing deadlines. The tighter the time crunch, the more tempted a programmer might be to skip important quality checking steps, or push forward without reviewing carefully the work that has already been done. To simulate the pressure of working in these situations, this lesson is structured as a team-based relay.

 

 


 

2) Team-Based Relay Game:

We will break our class into two small groups and line up in relay queues on one side of the room. (If weather permits, we may play outdoors allows for more distance, speed, and excitement).

The practice lesson was easy enough; now let's add some action! We're going to do the same type of thing (create a program describing an image) but now we're going to do it in relay teams, one symbol at a time.

The rules of this relay game are simple:

1) Divide students into two teams.

2) Have each group queue up relay-style.

3) Place an identical image at the other side of the room/gym/field from each team.

4) Have the first student in line dash over to the image, review it, and write down the first symbol in the program to reproduce that image.

5) The first student then runs back and tags the next person in line, then goes to the back of the queue.

6) The next person in line dashes to the image, reviews the image, reviews the program that has already been written, then either debugs the program by crossing out an incorrect symbol, or adds a new one.

7) That student then dashes back to tag the next person, and the process continues until one group has finished their program.

8) First group to finish the program carefully is the winner!

 

Play through this game several times, with images of increasing difficulty.

On the other side of the room (or yard), place one of the graph drawings across from each relay queue. Put a blank piece of paper very near each image.

 


 

Let's review our simple rules:

Each team sends over the first student in line to look at the graph paper image and draw the first programming symbol on the blank piece of paper nearby.

The student then returns to the queue and touches the next student’s hand.

The next student then goes up to the papers, looks at the image, reviews the programming of the previous students, and adds a symbol.

If a student finds a bug in the group’s program, the student should use their turn to X the already written code instead of adding another symbol.

This process repeats until the group is confident that they have programmed the entire image correctly. The speed and energy of the game depends on whether it is being played outdoors or inside a classroom.

A winner is declared when the entire team believes they are done, and the teacher and students check the accuracy of the algorithm in recreating the original drawing.

This game can be played again with multiple drawings or multiple adjustments.

When the game is over, gather the students and ask them about what they learned.

 


Relay Programming Reflection:

• Was it easy to create perfect code when you were working so quickly?

• How easy/hard was it to read the code that the group had already written?

• Did you find any bugs? How did you know they were bugs?

• Was is simpler or more complicated to have several people involved in the creation at different times?

• Are there any tricks that you can think of to make the work easier for the person who follows you?

• What do you wish the person before you would have done to help you be faster? Or what did they do to help you be faster/more accurate?

 


 

♦Check your Accelerated Intro to CS Course Progress so far in your Code.org account:

 
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 
 
 

 

The Farmer 3 Code.org Activity

 

Welcome to debugging! The farmer’s code doesn't work right. Can you spot the problem and fix it so that she can get her field flat and ready for planting? Use all the same blocks arranged in categories: Actions: Move Forward, Turn, Remove, Fill; Functions: Do something; Logic: If there is a pile, hole, path ahead; Loops: While path ahead, do, Repeat, and Counters; and Math: change value; and Variables: Set to value, Rename variable, and New variable.
 

Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo and check notifications for our Coding and Computer Science group. Check your Profile for Edmodo badges earned so far.
 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and work in your Accelerated Intro to CS Course activities.
 
 
3) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 
4) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 

 
 
  Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Mon, 25 Jun 2018
DAY 12 - Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - June 26, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310471&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - DAY 12
 
♦Please take this survey first today to tell us your last day of Summer School 2018. (Take this survey only one time!)
 

♦LEARNING POST-ASSESSMENTS:

On your last day (or before), using no notes:

1) Take the Computer Science POST-TEST.

2) Take the Coding POST-TEST.

 
 

♦CODING & COMPUTER SCIENCE VOCAB CHECK-UP:
 
♦OPTIONAL: Play Quizlet Live with our class.
 
1) Take the Matching QUIZLET Coding Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
2) Take the Matching QUIZLET Computer Science Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
♦Based on your current score, STUDY Coding and Computer Science vocabulary terms in Quizlet to prepare for two class FINAL ASSESSMENTS.
 

 

CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE - DAY 12
 
Code.org THE INTERNET:
 

Lesson Overview:

Students will explore how the Internet works, as it relates to URL addresses and Web pages. As they pretend to flow through the Internet, students learn about Web addresses, IP addresses, and the DNS (Domain Name Service).

 

 
 
Essential Question:

What is the Internet, and how does it work?

 

• I can learn about the complexity of sending messages over the Internet.

• I can translate Web addresses into IP addresses.

• I can practice creative problem solving.

 
 
Key Vocabulary:
 

DNS (Domain Name Service) — (n.) The service that translates URLs to IP addresses.

DSL/Cable — (n.) A method of sending information using telephone or television cables.

Fiber-Optic Cable — (n.) A cable that uses light to send information (often shortened to “fiber”).

Internet — (n.) A group of computers and servers that are networked together.

IP (Internet Protocol) — (n.) An agreed upon set of requirements for delivering packets across a network.

IP Address — (n.) A number assigned to any item that is connected to the Internet.

Network — (n.) A group of things that are connected to each other.

Packets — (n.) Small chunks of information that have been carefully formed from larger chunks of information.

Routing — (v.) Finding the best path through a network.

Servers — (n.) Computers that exist only to provide information to others.

URL (Universal Resource Locator) — (n.) An easy-to-remember address for calling a web page (like www.code.org).

Wi-Fi — (n.) A wireless method of sending information using radio waves.

 


 

 
 
REVIEW:

Think back to our last Relay Programming lesson.

Class Participation Questions:

• What did we do in our last lesson?

• What is debugging?

• Why is it important?

 


Lesson Steps:
 
 
What is the Internet?
 
The Internet is an extremely busy place. Although it may seem like everything happens instantly, information travels through virtual channels at all times during the day and night.
 
The Internet is a public place and is thus used by billions of people across the globe each day. It is important that we strive to use the Internet safely and responsibly, avoiding sharing private and personal information, protecting ourselves from scammers and hackers, and taking care to send kind messages to other people. It is also important to remember that everything we search, post, and send online becomes part of our digital footprint, the information that people can find out about us on the Internet.
 
If we wanted to visit the Hortonville Area School District Web site, we might do one of the following:
 
1) Type www.hasd.org  into a Web browser.
2) Enter our school district name on a search engine.
 
It is important to understand that there is no www.hasd.org place to which information can travel via the Internet.
 
All addresses inside the Internet are combinations of numbers, rather than names. This is just like our telephones. We may place a call by selecting “Grandma’s Cell” from our address book, but underneath, we are really dialing a ten-digit number.
 
Something similar happens with web pages. When you ask for a Web site address “www.code.org,” the inquiry goes out to the Internet to translate that name into an IP address, or number assigned to any item that is connected to the Internet.
 
After a series of steps, the inquiry comes upon the DNS Translation Table, where it can acquire the numerical version of the URL address that you originally entered. At last, you have the number of the place where you are going to send or receive your information.
 
However, that is only part of the challenge. Believe it or not, the Internet is not able to send and receive an unlimited amount of information at one time.
 
Sending a message over the Internet is a lot like sending a message through the mail if every letter we sent required thousands of envelopes!
 
Every message we send through the Internet gets chopped up and each piece is wrapped in its own version of an envelope. These packets are specially formed chunks of information that easily flow through any of the Internet's channels.
 
Sometimes, a few of those packets will get lost, because the Internet is a crazy place. In that case, the packets need to be resent, and the whole message is put on hold until they arrive.
 
Even if you're sending messages to another person, they first have to go to at least one server, a special computer that is supposed to be always on and ready to send and receive information. Every website has a server. Even email goes through servers.
 
Servers don't have names like you and I do. They are actually addressed using numbers called IP addresses, and they look a little strange.
For example: One of Code.org's IP addresses is 54.243.71.82
 
 
Think of it like trying to send all your favorite pictures to your grandma in just one single envelope. It just wouldn’t all fit. Instead, you need to break your message up into smaller pieces. You can send a series of these envelopes to your grandma, each with its own “packet.”
 
  • So, what if there is a delay in the mail, and a few of the envelopes come at the wrong time, and a few of the envelopes are missing altogether?
  • How can Grandma know if all the envelopes arrived?
  • How can she know which ones are missing, or what order to open them?
 
To solve that problem, we can number each of the envelopes as X of Y. If one of our messages is cut into 10 pieces, we will label the pieces 1 of 10, 2 of 10, and so on.
 
Next, we are going to play an Internet game in which students will simulate sending messages over the Internet. Students will come to the front table and prepare to deliver messages to students standing in the back of the class. First, we will need Message Writers in the front. Next, we will need the Servers to stand in the back of the computer lab.
 
The Servers will all have numbers that they can hold to identify where each Message Writer needs to go. These are called IP addresses.
 
The Message Writers will select a message from the pile. Each message tells us the URL where it needs to be delivered, how many pieces it must be broken into, and what method it is using to be delivered (Fiber, Wi-Fi, or DSL/Cable).
 
Each Message Writer needs to follow these instructions:
 
1) Translate the URL to an IP address using the DNS Translation Table on the board.
 
2) Rip the message into the number of pieces mentioned on the envelope.
 
3) Number each piece appropriately.
 
4) Carry the message, one piece at a time, to the Server in the method appropriate for the transmission type:
 
Wi-Fi: Convenient, but spotty. Wi-Fi doesn’t require cables, but since the signal bounces all over the place, packets can get lost pretty easily. Simulation: Internet must carry each packet on their shoulder (no hands).
 
Cable/DSL: Fairly good at delivering messages, but you must be connected to a wire. Simulation: Internet must carry each packet on the back of one hand and must keep the other hand touching a wall, desk, chair or the floor at all times.
 
Fiber Optic Cable: The best at delivering messages, but you must be connected to a wire. Simulation: Internet can carry packets in hand, but must keep the other hand touching a wall, desk, chair or the floor at all times.
 
Whenever a piece of the message touches the ground, it is considered a “dropped packet” and the Internet User must ignore that packet until the rest of the pieces have been delivered, then return to the front of the room and re-deliver any dropped packets.
 
5) Servers will put all messages back together on their side of the room.
 
6) The game is over when all Servers have re-assembled their messages, delivered them to another person, and the Message Receivers have read their messages out loud.
 
• Which method of delivery was easiest to complete without dropping a packet?
• If Wi-Fi drops so many packets, why do you suppose it is still used?
• Do you think it is possible to create a method of delivery that does not require cables but is more reliable than radio waves? What might that look like?
 
 

 
 
REVIEW OF INTERNET GAME STEPS:
1) Describe the Internet and DNS to students.
2) Explain the Internet Game.
3) Choose volunteers to act as Internet Users, and an equal number to be Servers.
4) Give each server an IP address.
5) Give each Internet User a message with instructions for delivery.
6) Internet Users must prepare message for delivery as noted, translate the URL to an IP address, then deliver in the style required by the type of transmission.
7) Servers can put messages back together in order and the game is complete when all Servers have read their messages.
8) The Server then needs to relay the information to a third party. This is a more accurate version of how message delivery works, since a message is rarely just left on the server.
 
Internet Game Reflection:
  • What did we learn?
  • What kind of connection would you rather have (Wi-Fi, DSL/Cable, or Fiber Optic)? Why?
  • Why might it take your message a long time to get somewhere?

 

♦Check your Accelerated Intro to CS Course Progress so far in your Code.org account:

 
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 
 
 

 

The Artist 5 Code.org Activity

 

In these puzzles, you are a zombie artist who loves drawing. Try running programs and making changes to see what happens. Can you figure out how it works? Or will you delete it and replace it with something totally different? Use all the same blocks arranged in categories: Actions: Move Forward, Turn, Draw; Color: Set Color; Functions: Do something; Logic: if, =, and, not, true, null, test if true if false; Loops: Repeat, and Counters; Math: change value; and Variables: Set i to value, set counter to.
 

Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo and check notifications for our Coding and Computer Science group. Check your Profile for Edmodo badges earned so far.
 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and work in your Accelerated Intro to CS Course activities.
 
 
3) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 
4) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 

 
 
  Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Tue, 26 Jun 2018
DAY 13 - Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - June 27, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310472&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - DAY 13
 
 

 

♦LEARNING POST-ASSESSMENTS:

TODAY OR TOMORROW, no notes:

1) Take Computer Science POST-TEST.

2) Take the Coding POST-TEST.

 

 

♦FINAL CODING & COMPUTER SCIENCE VOCAB REVIEW: ♦OPTIONAL: Play Quizlet Live with our class.
 
1) Take the Matching QUIZLET Coding Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
2) Take the Matching QUIZLET Computer Science Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
♦Based on your current score, STUDY Coding and Computer Science vocabulary terms in Quizlet to prepare for TOMORROW'S two class FINAL ASSESSMENTS.
 

 

CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE - DAY 13
 
Code.org WRAP-UP:
 

Lesson Overview:

Students prepare and present a mini-lesson, game, or activity to teach the class a key coding or computer science concept that continues our learning in computer science. Our final wrap-up session in the 20-hour Accelerated Intro to CS Course series will help us to relive our favorite moments, while providing us with the next steps to take to continue our computer science learning journey on our own.

 

 
 
Essential Question:

Which computer science or coding concept(s) or skill(s) do I wish to review and teach the class?

 

• I can recall learning events covered over the last 19 Code.org lessons.

• I can reinvent concepts already covered by creating new games, activities, or mini-lessons.

• I can work in small groups to blend seemingly unique subjects.

 
 
 

 

Code.org Coding and Computer Science Vocabulary

 

Coding Vocabulary:

*Abstraction — (n.) Removing details from a solution so that it can work for many problems.

*Algorithm — (n.) A list of steps to finish a task. A set of instructions that can be performed with or without a computer.

Ambiguous — (adj.) Having more than one meaning

Automate — (v.) To make something happen automatically (without help from people).

*Blockly (block-based programming language) — (n.) A visual programming language where you drag and drop blocks to write code.

*Bug — (n.) Problem with your code.

*Call (a function) — (n.) This is the piece of code that you add to a program to indicate that the program should run the code inside a function at a certain time.

Chorus — (n.) A piece of music that repeats often

*Code — (n.) One or more commands or algorithm(s) designed to be carried out by a computer.

Coding — (n. / v.) Transforming actions into a symbolic language

*Command — (n.) An instruction for the computer. Many commands put together make up algorithms and computer programs.

*Conditional — (n.) A statement that is either true or false depending on the situation.

*Debugging — (n. / v.) Finding and fixing problems in code.

*Decompose — (v.) To break a hard problem up into smaller, easier ones.

Decrement — (n.) To subtract a certain amount (often 1), once or many times.

Efficiency — (adj.) Having the best outcome for the least amount of work.

Else — (n.) Another way of saying “Otherwise.”

Environment — (n.) The world in which we live.

Evaluate — (v.) To work at an answer.

*Event — (n.) An action that causes something to happen.

*Event-handler — (n.) A monitor for a specific event or action on a computer. When you write code for an event handler, it will be executed every time that event or action occurs. Many event-handlers respond to human actions such as mouse clicks.

*Function — (n.) A piece of code that can be called over and over.

Function Call — (n.) The piece of a program that sends the computer to a function.

Function Definition — (n.) The piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function.

Function Definition — (n.) The piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function.

If Statement — (n.) A line that determines whether or not you run a certain chunk of code.

Increment — (n.) To add a certain amount (often 1), once or many times

Interface — (n.) The way something allows you to connect with it.

*Iteration — (n.) A repetitive action or command typically created with programming loops.

*Loop — (n.) The action of doing something over and over again.

Nested Statements — (n.) A statement inside another statement.

Open Source — (n.) Software that is created for free use by everyone.

*Packets — (n.) Small chunks of information that have been carefully formed from larger chunks of information.

Parameters — (n.) Extra bits of information that you can pass into a function to customize it.

Pattern — (n.) A theme that is repeated many times.

Persistence — (n.) Trying again and again, even when something is very hard.

*Program — (n.) Instructions that can be understood and followed by a machine.

Programming — (n.) Writing instructions for a digital tool.

Queue — (n.) 1. A waiting line; 2. A sequence of messages or jobs held in temporary storage in a computer awaiting transmission or processing.

Recursive — (n.) A definition that refers to the word it is trying to define.

Sequence — (n.) The order in which things are done.

Simulation — (n.) Pretending to be (a stand-in for) the real thing.

Specific(n.) Referring to only one exact thing.

Template (n.) A frame to guide you in creating something new.

*Toolbox — (n.) The tall grey bar in the middle section of Code.org's online learning system where all the commands you can use to write your program are displayed.

*Variable – (n.) A placeholder for a value that can change.

*Workspace — (n.) The white area on Code.org's online learning system where you drag and drop commands to build your program.

 

Computer Science Vocabulary:

*Binary — (n.) A way of representing information using only two options.

*Computational Thinking — (n.) A method of problem-solving that helps computer scientists prepare problems for digital solutions.

*Computer Science — (n.) The art of blending human ideas and digital tools to increase problem solving power.

*Computer Scientist — (n.) A person who is skilled at modifying problems for digital solutions.

*Crowdsourcing — (n.) Getting help from a large group of people to finish something faster.

*Data — (n.) Information, including: facts, samples, names and numbers.

*Digital Citizen — (n.) Someone who acts safely, responsibly, and respectfully online.

*Digital Footprint — (n.) The information about someone on the Internet.

*DNS (Domain Name Service) — (n.) The service that translates URLs to IP addresses.

*DSL/Cable — (n.) A method of sending information using telephone or television cables.

*Fiber-Optic Cable — (n.) A cable that uses light to send information (often shortened to “fiber”).

*Internet — (n.) A group of computers and servers that are networked together.

IP (Internet Protocol) — (n.) An agreed upon set of requirements for delivering packets across a network.

*IP Address — (n.) A number assigned to any item that is connected to the Internet.

Network — (n.) A group of things that are connected to each other.

Routing — (v.) Finding the best path through a network.

*Servers — (n.) Computers that exist only to provide information to others.

*URL (Universal Resource Locator) — (n.) An easy-to-remember address for calling a web page (like www.code.org).

*Username — (n.) A name you make up so that you can see or do things on a website, sometimes called a "screen name."

*Wi-Fi — (n.) A wireless method of sending information using radio waves.

 


MATERIALS:

It is a good idea to provide a large variety of items to pique the classroom interest and prompt clever inventions. Some inspiring materials tend to be:

 

• Battery-operated tea lights

• Aluminum foil

• Lego blocks

• Markers

• Paper (lined, blank, graph, construction)

• Scissors

• Tape

• Beads

• String

• Popsicle sticks

• Pipe cleaners

 

PREPARATION:

We may review some ideas together beforehand, but we can also literally just pile the supplies on the table and encourage students to be creative and begin!

 
 

 


Lesson Steps:
 

This is our final opportunity to be specific about the concepts that our class has learned over the last 20 lessons. Hopefully, we will create some interesting games or learning activities for our class that provide insight as to how much we have really learned and digested.

 

We have almost completed the entire Code.org Accelerated Intro to CS Course. That is a *huge* achievement, given that you have learned more over these past three weeks than most adults will ever know about coding and computer science. This now puts us in an elite category of thinkers, and we should really consider “paying it forward” and sharing our knowledge with others.

 

Let’s review our lessons completed below. Computer Science is a skill just like any other, and concepts start to feel a lot simpler the more we practice.

 

1) Intro: What is Computer Science?

2) Maze #1: Sequence, Loops, Conditionals, Nesting

3) Computational Thinking: Decompose, Patterns, Abstraction, Algorithms

4) Graph Paper Programming: Draw what the algorithm tells you

5) Artist #1: Draw Shapes, Loops, Increment

6) Algorithms: Put shapes into pictures, Folding paper

7) Artist #2: Figure out algorithm

8) Functional Activity: Sun-catchers - Program, functions, variables

9) Farmer #1: Conditionals, Repetition, Variables

10) Conditionals Exercise: Coding with Cards

11) Artist #3: Calling functions, Repeat with Loops, Variables & Parameters

12) Song Writing: Functions like a chorus, Passing parameters, Parameters as Variables

13) Farmer #2: Functions

14) Abstraction: Mad Lib style stories

15) Artist #4: Functions and Parameters

16) Coding Under Pressure: Double Checking, Debugging

17) Farmer #3: Importance of Order, Debug pre-made program

18) Internet: What is the Internet? How does it work?

19) Artist #5: Free Play

20) CS Wrap-Up: What did we learn? What was your favorite part?

 

Individually or in a small group of 2-3 students, choose one coding or computer science concept or skill and create a game or activity that teaches us to understand your chosen concept or skill.

 

You have free access to the materials table and your computers. When we reconvene, each group will describe their game, mini-lesson, or learning activity to the class. If we enjoy the games, we could play them on another day.

 

Congratulations to all of us who have completed all 2o Code.org Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons (or who are still working toward completing them). Computer science is still a rare skill, and now our class has grasped the basics of it!

 

Be sure to check out more resources to continue your coding and computer science learning on your own. Some of the best resources include Code.org Learn Beyond and CS Is Fun.

 

 

♦Check your Accelerated Intro to CS Course Progress so far in your Code.org account:

 
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 
 
 

 


Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo and check notifications for our Coding and Computer Science group. Check your Profile for Edmodo badges earned so far.
 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and work in your Accelerated Intro to CS Course activities.
 
 
3) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 
4) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 

 
 
  Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Wed, 27 Jun 2018
DAY 14 - Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - June 28, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310473&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - DAY 14
 
 

 

♦LEARNING POST-ASSESSMENTS:

TODAY, using no notes or resources:

1) Take Computer Science POST-TEST.

2) Take the Coding POST-TEST.

 

 

♦FINAL CODING & COMPUTER SCIENCE VOCAB REVIEW: ♦OPTIONAL: Play Quizlet Live with our class.
 
1) Take the Matching QUIZLET Coding Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
2) Take the Matching QUIZLET Computer Science Test and submit current score in Edmodo.
 
 
♦Based on your current score, STUDY Coding and Computer Science vocabulary terms in Quizlet to prepare for TOMORROW'S two class FINAL ASSESSMENTS.
 

 

CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE - DAY 14
 
Code.org WRAP-UP:
 

Lesson Overview:

Students prepare and present a mini-lesson, game, or activity to teach the class a key coding or computer science concept that continues our learning in computer science. Our final wrap-up session in the 20-hour Accelerated Intro to CS Course series will help us to relive our favorite moments, while providing us with the next steps to take to continue our computer science learning journey on our own.

 

 
 
Essential Question:

Which computer science or coding concept(s) or skill(s) do I wish to review and teach the class?

 

• I can recall learning events covered over the last 19 Code.org lessons.

• I can reinvent concepts already covered by creating new games, activities, or mini-lessons.

• I can work in small groups to blend seemingly unique subjects.

 
 
 

 

Code.org Coding and Computer Science Vocabulary

 

Coding Vocabulary:

*Abstraction — (n.) Removing details from a solution so that it can work for many problems.

*Algorithm — (n.) A list of steps to finish a task. A set of instructions that can be performed with or without a computer.

Ambiguous — (adj.) Having more than one meaning

Automate — (v.) To make something happen automatically (without help from people).

*Blockly (block-based programming language) — (n.) A visual programming language where you drag and drop blocks to write code.

*Bug — (n.) Problem with your code.

*Call (a function) — (n.) This is the piece of code that you add to a program to indicate that the program should run the code inside a function at a certain time.

Chorus — (n.) A piece of music that repeats often

*Code — (n.) One or more commands or algorithm(s) designed to be carried out by a computer.

Coding — (n. / v.) Transforming actions into a symbolic language

*Command — (n.) An instruction for the computer. Many commands put together make up algorithms and computer programs.

*Conditional — (n.) A statement that is either true or false depending on the situation.

*Debugging — (n. / v.) Finding and fixing problems in code.

*Decompose — (v.) To break a hard problem up into smaller, easier ones.

Decrement — (n.) To subtract a certain amount (often 1), once or many times.

Efficiency — (adj.) Having the best outcome for the least amount of work.

Else — (n.) Another way of saying “Otherwise.”

Environment — (n.) The world in which we live.

Evaluate — (v.) To work at an answer.

*Event — (n.) An action that causes something to happen.

*Event-handler — (n.) A monitor for a specific event or action on a computer. When you write code for an event handler, it will be executed every time that event or action occurs. Many event-handlers respond to human actions such as mouse clicks.

*Function — (n.) A piece of code that can be called over and over.

Function Call — (n.) The piece of a program that sends the computer to a function.

Function Definition — (n.) The piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function.

Function Definition — (n.) The piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function.

If Statement — (n.) A line that determines whether or not you run a certain chunk of code.

Increment — (n.) To add a certain amount (often 1), once or many times

Interface — (n.) The way something allows you to connect with it.

*Iteration — (n.) A repetitive action or command typically created with programming loops.

*Loop — (n.) The action of doing something over and over again.

Nested Statements — (n.) A statement inside another statement.

Open Source — (n.) Software that is created for free use by everyone.

*Packets — (n.) Small chunks of information that have been carefully formed from larger chunks of information.

Parameters — (n.) Extra bits of information that you can pass into a function to customize it.

Pattern — (n.) A theme that is repeated many times.

Persistence — (n.) Trying again and again, even when something is very hard.

*Program — (n.) Instructions that can be understood and followed by a machine.

Programming — (n.) Writing instructions for a digital tool.

Queue — (n.) 1. A waiting line; 2. A sequence of messages or jobs held in temporary storage in a computer awaiting transmission or processing.

Recursive — (n.) A definition that refers to the word it is trying to define.

Sequence — (n.) The order in which things are done.

Simulation — (n.) Pretending to be (a stand-in for) the real thing.

Specific(n.) Referring to only one exact thing.

Template (n.) A frame to guide you in creating something new.

*Toolbox — (n.) The tall grey bar in the middle section of Code.org's online learning system where all the commands you can use to write your program are displayed.

*Variable – (n.) A placeholder for a value that can change.

*Workspace — (n.) The white area on Code.org's online learning system where you drag and drop commands to build your program.

 

Computer Science Vocabulary:

*Binary — (n.) A way of representing information using only two options.

*Computational Thinking — (n.) A method of problem-solving that helps computer scientists prepare problems for digital solutions.

*Computer Science — (n.) The art of blending human ideas and digital tools to increase problem solving power.

*Computer Scientist — (n.) A person who is skilled at modifying problems for digital solutions.

*Crowdsourcing — (n.) Getting help from a large group of people to finish something faster.

*Data — (n.) Information, including: facts, samples, names and numbers.

*Digital Citizen — (n.) Someone who acts safely, responsibly, and respectfully online.

*Digital Footprint — (n.) The information about someone on the Internet.

*DNS (Domain Name Service) — (n.) The service that translates URLs to IP addresses.

*DSL/Cable — (n.) A method of sending information using telephone or television cables.

*Fiber-Optic Cable — (n.) A cable that uses light to send information (often shortened to “fiber”).

*Internet — (n.) A group of computers and servers that are networked together.

IP (Internet Protocol) — (n.) An agreed upon set of requirements for delivering packets across a network.

*IP Address — (n.) A number assigned to any item that is connected to the Internet.

Network — (n.) A group of things that are connected to each other.

Routing — (v.) Finding the best path through a network.

*Servers — (n.) Computers that exist only to provide information to others.

*URL (Universal Resource Locator) — (n.) An easy-to-remember address for calling a web page (like www.code.org).

*Username — (n.) A name you make up so that you can see or do things on a website, sometimes called a "screen name."

*Wi-Fi — (n.) A wireless method of sending information using radio waves.

 


MATERIALS:

It is a good idea to provide a large variety of items to pique the classroom interest and prompt clever inventions. Some inspiring materials tend to be:

 

• Battery-operated tea lights

• Aluminum foil

• Lego blocks

• Markers

• Paper (lined, blank, graph, construction)

• Scissors

• Tape

• Beads

• String

• Popsicle sticks

• Pipe cleaners

 

PREPARATION:

We may review some ideas together beforehand, but we can also literally just pile the supplies on the table and encourage students to be creative and begin!

 
 

 


Lesson Steps:
 

This is our final opportunity to be specific about the concepts that our class has learned over the last 20 lessons. Hopefully, we will create some interesting games or learning activities for our class that provide insight as to how much we have really learned and digested.

 

We have almost completed the entire Code.org Accelerated Intro to CS Course. That is a *huge* achievement, given that you have learned more over these past three weeks than most adults will ever know about coding and computer science. This now puts us in an elite category of thinkers, and we should really consider “paying it forward” and sharing our knowledge with others.

 

Let’s review our lessons completed below. Computer Science is a skill just like any other, and concepts start to feel a lot simpler the more we practice.

 

1) Intro: What is Computer Science?

2) Maze #1: Sequence, Loops, Conditionals, Nesting

3) Computational Thinking: Decompose, Patterns, Abstraction, Algorithms

4) Graph Paper Programming: Draw what the algorithm tells you

5) Artist #1: Draw Shapes, Loops, Increment

6) Algorithms: Put shapes into pictures, Folding paper

7) Artist #2: Figure out algorithm

8) Functional Activity: Sun-catchers - Program, functions, variables

9) Farmer #1: Conditionals, Repetition, Variables

10) Conditionals Exercise: Coding with Cards

11) Artist #3: Calling functions, Repeat with Loops, Variables & Parameters

12) Song Writing: Functions like a chorus, Passing parameters, Parameters as Variables

13) Farmer #2: Functions

14) Abstraction: Mad Lib style stories

15) Artist #4: Functions and Parameters

16) Coding Under Pressure: Double Checking, Debugging

17) Farmer #3: Importance of Order, Debug pre-made program

18) Internet: What is the Internet? How does it work?

19) Artist #5: Free Play

20) CS Wrap-Up: What did we learn? What was your favorite part?

 

Individually or in a small group of 2-3 students, choose one coding or computer science concept or skill and create a game or activity that teaches us to understand your chosen concept or skill.

 

You have free access to the materials table and your computers. When we reconvene, each group will describe their game, mini-lesson, or learning activity to the class. If we enjoy the games, we could play them on another day.

 

Congratulations to all of us who have completed all 2o Code.org Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons (or who are still working toward completing them). Computer science is still a rare skill, and now our class has grasped the basics of it!

 

Be sure to check out more resources to continue your coding and computer science learning on your own. Some of the best resources include Code.org Learn Beyond and CS Is Fun.

 

 

♦Check your Accelerated Intro to CS Course Progress so far in your Code.org account:

 
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 
 
 

 


Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo. Check the badges you have earned in your Profile. Post your own special Code.org creations to our Coding and Computer Science group.
 
 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and work in your Accelerated Intro to CS Course activities.
 
 
3) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 
4) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 

 
 
  Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Thu, 28 Jun 2018
DAY 15 - Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - June 29, 2018 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=310474&memberid=134
Coding and Computer Science for Kids 1 - DAY 15
 
 

 

IF YOU DID NOT ALREADY TAKE AND SCORE 80% OR HIGHER ON THE TWO FINAL LEARNING POST-ASSESSMENTS DURING CLASS:

FIRST TODAY, using no notes:

1) Take Computer Science POST-TEST.

2) Take the Coding POST-TEST.

 


 
♦CHECK YOUR EDMODO PROFILE TO VERIFY THAT YOU HAVE EARNED EITHER AN 80%+ OR 100% ACE BADGE FOR BOTH THE CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE ASSESSMENTS:
 
 

 

 

 

CODING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE - DAY 15
 
Code.org FINISH ALL 20 CODE.ORG LESSONS:
 

• I can recall learning events covered over the last 20 Code.org lessons.

• I can complete all 20 Code.org lessons.

• I can continue my Coding and Computer Science learning using two sites: Code.org Learn Beyond and CS Is Fun.

 
 

 

Lesson Overview:

Students work diligently to complete ALL 20 ONLINE Code.org lessons. AFTER completing all 20 plugged lessons, students may complete online learning activities linked to these two sites only: Code.org Learn Beyond and CS Is Fun.

 

 
 
 
Essential Question:

Which computer science and coding skills do I need to use to finish ALL 20 Code.org ONLINE lessons?

 

 

Code.org Coding and Computer Science Vocabulary

 

Coding Vocabulary:

*Abstraction — (n.) Removing details from a solution so that it can work for many problems.

*Algorithm — (n.) A list of steps to finish a task. A set of instructions that can be performed with or without a computer.

Ambiguous — (adj.) Having more than one meaning

Automate — (v.) To make something happen automatically (without help from people).

*Blockly (block-based programming language) — (n.) A visual programming language where you drag and drop blocks to write code.

*Bug — (n.) Problem with your code.

*Call (a function) — (n.) This is the piece of code that you add to a program to indicate that the program should run the code inside a function at a certain time.

Chorus — (n.) A piece of music that repeats often

*Code — (n.) One or more commands or algorithm(s) designed to be carried out by a computer.

Coding — (n. / v.) Transforming actions into a symbolic language

*Command — (n.) An instruction for the computer. Many commands put together make up algorithms and computer programs.

*Conditional — (n.) A statement that is either true or false depending on the situation.

*Debugging — (n. / v.) Finding and fixing problems in code.

*Decompose — (v.) To break a hard problem up into smaller, easier ones.

Decrement — (n.) To subtract a certain amount (often 1), once or many times.

Efficiency — (adj.) Having the best outcome for the least amount of work.

Else — (n.) Another way of saying “Otherwise.”

Environment — (n.) The world in which we live.

Evaluate — (v.) To work at an answer.

*Event — (n.) An action that causes something to happen.

*Event-handler — (n.) A monitor for a specific event or action on a computer. When you write code for an event handler, it will be executed every time that event or action occurs. Many event-handlers respond to human actions such as mouse clicks.

*Function — (n.) A piece of code that can be called over and over.

Function Call — (n.) The piece of a program that sends the computer to a function.

Function Definition — (n.) The piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function.

Function Definition — (n.) The piece of a program that tells the computer what to do when the code calls a function.

If Statement — (n.) A line that determines whether or not you run a certain chunk of code.

Increment — (n.) To add a certain amount (often 1), once or many times

Interface — (n.) The way something allows you to connect with it.

*Iteration — (n.) A repetitive action or command typically created with programming loops.

*Loop — (n.) The action of doing something over and over again.

Nested Statements — (n.) A statement inside another statement.

Open Source — (n.) Software that is created for free use by everyone.

*Packets — (n.) Small chunks of information that have been carefully formed from larger chunks of information.

Parameters — (n.) Extra bits of information that you can pass into a function to customize it.

Pattern — (n.) A theme that is repeated many times.

Persistence — (n.) Trying again and again, even when something is very hard.

*Program — (n.) Instructions that can be understood and followed by a machine.

Programming — (n.) Writing instructions for a digital tool.

Queue — (n.) 1. A waiting line; 2. A sequence of messages or jobs held in temporary storage in a computer awaiting transmission or processing.

Recursive — (n.) A definition that refers to the word it is trying to define.

Sequence — (n.) The order in which things are done.

Simulation — (n.) Pretending to be (a stand-in for) the real thing.

Specific(n.) Referring to only one exact thing.

Template (n.) A frame to guide you in creating something new.

*Toolbox — (n.) The tall grey bar in the middle section of Code.org's online learning system where all the commands you can use to write your program are displayed.

*Variable – (n.) A placeholder for a value that can change.

*Workspace — (n.) The white area on Code.org's online learning system where you drag and drop commands to build your program.

 

Computer Science Vocabulary:

*Binary — (n.) A way of representing information using only two options.

*Computational Thinking — (n.) A method of problem-solving that helps computer scientists prepare problems for digital solutions.

*Computer Science — (n.) The art of blending human ideas and digital tools to increase problem solving power.

*Computer Scientist — (n.) A person who is skilled at modifying problems for digital solutions.

*Crowdsourcing — (n.) Getting help from a large group of people to finish something faster.

*Data — (n.) Information, including: facts, samples, names and numbers.

*Digital Citizen — (n.) Someone who acts safely, responsibly, and respectfully online.

*Digital Footprint — (n.) The information about someone on the Internet.

*DNS (Domain Name Service) — (n.) The service that translates URLs to IP addresses.

*DSL/Cable — (n.) A method of sending information using telephone or television cables.

*Fiber-Optic Cable — (n.) A cable that uses light to send information (often shortened to “fiber”).

*Internet — (n.) A group of computers and servers that are networked together.

IP (Internet Protocol) — (n.) An agreed upon set of requirements for delivering packets across a network.

*IP Address — (n.) A number assigned to any item that is connected to the Internet.

Network — (n.) A group of things that are connected to each other.

Routing — (v.) Finding the best path through a network.

*Servers — (n.) Computers that exist only to provide information to others.

*URL (Universal Resource Locator) — (n.) An easy-to-remember address for calling a web page (like www.code.org).

*Username — (n.) A name you make up so that you can see or do things on a website, sometimes called a "screen name."

*Wi-Fi — (n.) A wireless method of sending information using radio waves.

 


 

♦Check your Accelerated Intro to CS Course Progress so far in your Code.org account:

 
 
The circles will turn green when they are completed correctly.
 
 
 

 


Additional Learning Tasks:

 
1) Log in to Edmodo. Check the badges you have earned in your Profile. Post your own special Code.org creations to our Coding and Computer Science group.
 
 
2) Log in to your Code.org account and work in your Accelerated Intro to CS Course activities.
 
 
3) Explore and study vocabulary words and definitions using the following Quizlet sets:
(Optional: Join our Coding and Computer Science class by clicking here.)
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
(Study Flashcards and play Match game.)
[We will also play Quizlet Live at school.]
 
 
4) Check out additional coding apps and resources using your own devices at home.
 

 
 
  Curriculum Attribution: All Accelerated Intro to CS Course lessons are adapted directly from Code.org, an exemplary non-profit organization committed to educating and empowering students, teachers, and parents with essential coding and computer science technology skills.
]]>
Fri, 29 Jun 2018
HASD Spotlight on Education EXPO - March 28, 2019 http://www.hasd.org/pro/faculty/event_view.cfm?eventid=309984&memberid=134 Thu, 28 Mar 2019